Why Twitter’s Vine app could be your secret ingredient to creating cool content

“I highly recommend with all my heart figuring out how to tell a six-second story around your business as often as possible.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

Vine app

Vine app

I was scrolling through Twitter the other day and came across a tweet by Gary Vaynerchuk.

He was talking about how he’d just finished up a Twitter Q&A where people had tweeted him questions, and that he’d used the Vine app to answer them.

As you know from my podcast interview with him, I have a ton of respect for how Gary uses social media for his brand. 

In fact, I flat out think the dude’s brilliant and he has priorities in the right place.  My fiance might even call it a man crush, but I digress.

So whenever I see a tweet from him come across, I tend to give it some attention.

I clicked on the link and skimmed through the short Vine videos he’d posted.

He was having fun in each of the videos, taking the questions seriously, but not himself.

They were entertaining; he was dancing, high-fiving people in his office and balancing on chairs while he was answering the questions. 

He was using social media the way it’s intended — connecting with and adding value to people who follow him.

If you’ve not heard of Vine yet, by the way, it’s an app that allows you to create short videos and share them over the social networks.  It originally launched on Apple’s iOS earlier this year but just this week launched on Android too.

The videos are 6 seconds long and they loop when the 6 seconds are up. 

It’s a platform that allows you to create content around short, quick stories.

Chasing the Shiny New “Object”

Vine is one of the new “shiny tools” that has popped onto the social scene within the past several months. 

We love to chase these new shiny objects, don’t we? 

I know I’m guilty of that more times than I care to admit and it certainly goes against the approach to social media that I share with my clients.

Most small businesses tend to face the same challenge of spreading themselves too thin when it comes to social media.  They think they have to be everywhere, which actually hurts their efforts.

A better approach is to go “deep” and focus only on the couple of platforms where your ideal consumers are hanging out.

With that said, though, it’s always good to keep an eye on the latest fun toy.  To try and understand what it’s all about, its function, if it’s something that your consumers are using and if using it will help you achieve your business objectives.

And since social media is all about storytelling and creating great content, the Vine app may be one of the new social tools worth considering in your arsenal.

How Big Brands Are Using the Vine App

The common theme I’m hearing from big brand social media heads is that they are sitting back a bit and watching how others use Vine before jumping in themselves.  And, of course, they’re carefully watching consumers’ reaction.

Lesson alert!  Even the most successful brands in the world watch and learn from what other brands are doing.

But, there are still a number of big brands that have started doing cool things with Vine that are worth looking at and possibly modeling. 

These examples should get your creative juices flowing:

Handy tip from Lowe’s:

 

Calvin Klein showcasing a new fashion line:

 

GE gets really creative with this one.  Very cool…

How You Might Use the Vine App for Your Business

So if Vine is a social tool that you can use to help get you closer to achieving your objectives, how exactly might you use it for your business?

Here are some ideas that Vine is great for:

Take people behind the scenes.  People love going behind the scenes of businesses.  Here’s a cool example from Al Roker on The Today Show:

 

Give tipsLet’s say you’re a tax accountant and you’re gearing up for tax season.  You could create once a week tax tips for people.

Answer questionsSpecialize in nutrition?  Use a 6-second video to answer people’s questions about how to lose weight.

Solve a problemMaybe you’re a physical therapist.  You could create weekly videos that show common muscle tightness that people have and a quick stretch to help alleviate it.

Spotlight employees.  Have a business with employees?  Introduce them and have them say hello on video.

There are all kinds of things you could do.  Get creative and have FUN with it.

Best Practices for Using Vine

Even though Vine is still new, some best practices have evolved pretty quickly when using it. 

Here are a few you should consider:

Real-time.  Videos that are timely and relevant to current events tend to work well.  Just make sure the content you’re creating aligns with your business objectives.

Use #Hashtags.  People use hashtags to search on different topics whether on Vine itself or on Twitter.  Make your videos more easily discoverable by using hashtags.  Check out Vine’s “Explore” option to search by tag or trending topics.

Give people a reason to share.  Kind of a no-brainer but make your videos entertaining.  Add value to people.  Be unique.  The more sharing the more exposure your brand gets.

Connect emotionally.  The more you can connect emotionally to your consumer the more likely they are to connect with you on a personal level.  It’s the whole know, like and trust thing.  We know that business is built on relationships.  You can use Vine to build them.  And oh yea, people are also more likely to share your stuff when you connect on an emotional level.

Have fun.  Did I mention have fun and get creative with Vine?

Granted, since Vine is so new, there’s still a lot of skepticism over whether it will “catch on” or not.

Then again, people had the same skepticism around Twitter when it came out.

With over 500 million users, look at Twitter now…and Twitter owns Vine. 

I’d love to hear from you.  Have you used Vine yet?  Have you seen any cool uses of it?  Share your comments below. 

 

2 Responses to Why Twitter’s Vine app could be your secret ingredient to creating cool content

  1. Adam Dukes says:

    First off, I am glad I am not the only one with a supposed “man crush” on Mr. V. I know he is a fan of Vine, but tat was really cool how he answered all those people. I was not aware of that and thanks for the post.

    • Haha, right on, Adam. I thought Gary’s use of Vine to engage with his audience was great. Definitely a model for how others can use it. Glad you liked the post. — Rick

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